Young Designers Light Rail Ideas Competition

Consultation has concluded

On Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 April 2015, more than 100 year 9 and 10 students converged on the University of Canberra’s Inspire Centre to compete in a two day light rail ideas competition.

As future users of the light rail network, we are keen to engage young people and explore ideas for the future of our city. The competition provided a forum for young creative thinkers to work together in teams and generate design ideas for Canberra’s light rail of the future in a dynamic and collaborative process.

The calibre of all entries was outstanding, with each team presenting a range of wonderful ideas on the design and integration of light rail.

At a special evening award ceremony on Thursday 8 April, an expert judging panel and the Minister for Capital Metro, Simon Corbell, awarded first and second prizes in three categories. Congratulations to all of our competition winners.

Check out the winners in the forums below.

Competition participants

The following high schools participated in the Young Designers Light Rail Ideas Competition: St Edmunds College, St Francis Xavier College, Mount Stromlo High, Alfred Deakin High, Telopea Park, Daramalan College, Merici College, Canberra Grammar, Orana Steiner, University of Canberra High School Kaleen, Melba Copland Secondary College, Melrose High, St John Paul II College and Lyneham High.

On Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 April 2015, more than 100 year 9 and 10 students converged on the University of Canberra’s Inspire Centre to compete in a two day light rail ideas competition.

As future users of the light rail network, we are keen to engage young people and explore ideas for the future of our city. The competition provided a forum for young creative thinkers to work together in teams and generate design ideas for Canberra’s light rail of the future in a dynamic and collaborative process.

The calibre of all entries was outstanding, with each team presenting a range of wonderful ideas on the design and integration of light rail.

At a special evening award ceremony on Thursday 8 April, an expert judging panel and the Minister for Capital Metro, Simon Corbell, awarded first and second prizes in three categories. Congratulations to all of our competition winners.

Check out the winners in the forums below.

Competition participants

The following high schools participated in the Young Designers Light Rail Ideas Competition: St Edmunds College, St Francis Xavier College, Mount Stromlo High, Alfred Deakin High, Telopea Park, Daramalan College, Merici College, Canberra Grammar, Orana Steiner, University of Canberra High School Kaleen, Melba Copland Secondary College, Melrose High, St John Paul II College and Lyneham High.

Winning Designs

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
Discussions: All (5) Open (5)
  • Winners_page_03

    Lyneham High School team 'Crayons' designed a bold insertion into Garema Place. Bark has been used to inspire the design of the shelter. It's an inviting space for a diverse demographic.

    Design description:

    "We propose that the final light rail station is on the corner of the City Walk in Civic and Mort Street. We think it should be there because it is near the Canberra Centre where many people work. It is in a pedestrian zone that is safe for everyone, including the elderly, pregnant and disabled.

    The design for the station is based on natural elements sourced from... Continue reading

    Lyneham High School team 'Crayons' designed a bold insertion into Garema Place. Bark has been used to inspire the design of the shelter. It's an inviting space for a diverse demographic.

    Design description:

    "We propose that the final light rail station is on the corner of the City Walk in Civic and Mort Street. We think it should be there because it is near the Canberra Centre where many people work. It is in a pedestrian zone that is safe for everyone, including the elderly, pregnant and disabled.

    The design for the station is based on natural elements sourced from the O’Connor ridge. The structures are also made of reused wood. This reflects Canberra’s title as the bush capital. The two main structures are both sheltered but remain quite open. This creates a connection between the trees outside the station, making the architecture flow. The two structures are also quite unconventional in shape so as to mimic the nature that is so evident in Canberra.

    The ticket booths are made to look similar to a curled piece of bark. They are both made of a layer of reused wood that imitates this curled look. This wooden, natural look also shows the theme of the station.

    The larger structure, Block A, is for people waiting for the light rail. There are wooden benches for these potential passengers. This encourages social interactions between these people. It also contains the toilet and bike rack facilities.
     In the smaller structure, Block B, there is a coffee shop and cafe style seating. This seating can be used by cafe users and also creates a pleasant space for those who need to supervise their kids on the playground nearby.

    The station has a playground that entertains children while waiting for their train. It also keeps kids from running around the station which would pose a risk to themselves and others. The playground is made of wood so as to look similar to the other structures and to suit the theme. However, instead of imitating nature this structure is themed on trains.
    Both Block A and B have ticket booths nearby to buy and recharge tickets and cards. There will also be a timetable next to each ticket booth. The Station will be on the same level as the floor of the light rail to make it easier for seniors, mothers with prams and physically impaired to get on it.

    The light rail will also increase revenue for the shops and stores around where the light rail’s stops and stations are because of the light rail riders going to the shops or stores close to them out of convenience."

    Students: Peter Gedeon, Kiran Philips, Elise Palethorpe, Georgina Lyall

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Winners_page_06


    Telopea Park School's team 'telo2600' created symbols or icons to represent various stations that are meaningful to various places in Canberra. Envrionmental sustainability embodies the design and connects people to nature.

    Design description:

    "Our design stems from Canberra’s position as the “Bush Capital”. Canberra is renowned for its impressive community spaces which feature vast gardens and bushland environs. Therefore, we decided to complement Canberra’s urban design by “bringing the outdoors in”. This takes multiple forms and is the uniting feature of our entire design. The best way to encourage people to make the most of Canberra’s community facilities is to... Continue reading


    Telopea Park School's team 'telo2600' created symbols or icons to represent various stations that are meaningful to various places in Canberra. Envrionmental sustainability embodies the design and connects people to nature.

    Design description:

    "Our design stems from Canberra’s position as the “Bush Capital”. Canberra is renowned for its impressive community spaces which feature vast gardens and bushland environs. Therefore, we decided to complement Canberra’s urban design by “bringing the outdoors in”. This takes multiple forms and is the uniting feature of our entire design. The best way to encourage people to make the most of Canberra’s community facilities is to encourage the use of public transport as an easy and attractive method of getting around the city.

    Station design

    • Natural elements, reconnecting people with nature in the urban environment.
    • Uses recycled elements from Yarralumla’s brickworks, connecting with Canberra’s history. Features an open-roof design mirroring Canberra’s urban design.
    • A heavy emphasis on usability, with generous seating space, retail areas, and easy-to-understand wayfinding.
    • To prevent delays when boarding and alighting, MyWay card readers are located on platform, not on-board.

    Wayfinding

    • Makes it easier to use the light rail and connect with other public transport and public areas.
    • Accentuates the natural and historical features of the areas surrounding light rail stops.
    • Features a heavy emphasis on walking or using public transport as well as light rail.
    • Shows distances to community facilities and points of interest nearby.
    • Encourages people to utilise the system to explore the city and make the most of community space.

    Stop - Adaptable design for each stop

    • Looks good, simplifies the process of taking public transport.
    • Provides positive visual feedback, makes it easy to connect to other modes of transport, and encourages walking.
    • Heavy use of greenery and recycling natural materials such as wood. 
    • Stop will look at home in Canberra’s more historic areas yet still modern for many decades to come.

    Each stop is represented by a simple symbol inspire by historical features of the area – for example, a drawing of the Sydney and Melbourne buildings at the City stop, or a hill in Gungahlin representing the traditional Aboriginal mean of the name “little rocky hill”.

    An effective and meaningful way to represent the history of the area and enable easier use of the system for everyone, especially those with limited English. Design is easy to use, efficient, and incorporates Canberra’s heritage and original urban planning through our uniting theme of “bringing the outdoors in”.

    Light rail is the key to unlocking the city’s potential through uniting and bringing communities closer together, whilst keeping in mind a sustainable future and paying tribute to Canberra’s history as the “Bush Capital”."

     

    Students: Bella Rodrigues-Csokas, George Keleher, Phillippa Hall, Meilani Salale, Eleanor Foster

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Winners_page_08

    Lyneham High School team 'Leaps and Bounds' drew on Canberra's cultural history by using various poignant events to inspire a social timeline with different themes for each station.

    Design description:

    "Canberra, the capital of Australia, has a lot to be celebrated. This design embodies Canberra's diverse history of politics, war, society, sport and the people, through a timeline spread across the stops and stations. It commemorates, celebrates and combines the past and future, the old and the new of Canberra. Through interactive displays and informative themes, the design entertains and connects the local and city wide community into the light rail.... Continue reading

    Lyneham High School team 'Leaps and Bounds' drew on Canberra's cultural history by using various poignant events to inspire a social timeline with different themes for each station.

    Design description:

    "Canberra, the capital of Australia, has a lot to be celebrated. This design embodies Canberra's diverse history of politics, war, society, sport and the people, through a timeline spread across the stops and stations. It commemorates, celebrates and combines the past and future, the old and the new of Canberra. Through interactive displays and informative themes, the design entertains and connects the local and city wide community into the light rail. It's about time we moved into the future."

    Students: Max Ashurst, Claire Yung, Lisa Wu, Lucinda Antcliff, Michael Connolly

     

     

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Winners_page_04


    St John Paul College's team 'Get in Touch' focused on the natural envrionment and uses the shape of a leaf to shelter the rail stop. Tree banches were used as inspiration

    Design description:

    "The ‘Get in Touch’ theme is quite symbolic and can mean alot of things. It incorporates family, community or nature.

    How our design will ‘get you in touch’:

    • Opportunity for community based projects, adding a personal touch
    • Volunteer groups to help tend to gardens
    • Great acoustic sounds, inviting buskers andperformers
    • Evokes feeling
    • Appealing to a broad demographic
    • Raises environmental awareness
    • Aesthetically pleasing
    • Positive environment, having a positive... Continue reading


    St John Paul College's team 'Get in Touch' focused on the natural envrionment and uses the shape of a leaf to shelter the rail stop. Tree banches were used as inspiration

    Design description:

    "The ‘Get in Touch’ theme is quite symbolic and can mean alot of things. It incorporates family, community or nature.

    How our design will ‘get you in touch’:

    • Opportunity for community based projects, adding a personal touch
    • Volunteer groups to help tend to gardens
    • Great acoustic sounds, inviting buskers andperformers
    • Evokes feeling
    • Appealing to a broad demographic
    • Raises environmental awareness
    • Aesthetically pleasing
    • Positive environment, having a positive impact
      on all dimensions of health

    The Transit System is a complex system , comparable to a tree. Like a tree, the transit system connects all the leaves:

    Trunk – Stations

    Branches = Route

    Leaves = Stops

    Rooftop Meadow

    The moss on the roofs of some of the leaves gives the
    station/stop a natural look and feel – literally. This offers the opportunity
    for native fauna to grow, also attracting wildlife.

    Acoustic Design

    The shape of the leaf creates excellent sound projection and
    offers an ideal spot for performers and buskers

    Sun Shelter

    The large, arching leaves offer shade and shelter from the
    sun, whilst also letting in some light in

    Rain Shelter/Harvesting

    The design offers protection from the rain and also utilises
    the shape of the leaves to harvest the water in underground tanks to be used
    for irrigation."

    Students: Tim Velstra, Liam Gellatly, Charolotte Foster, Rios Valenzuela

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Winners_page12


    Daramalan and Merici College team 'Team Metro' produced an environmentally responsive design. It's a collection of hexagonal pods that forms a canopy inspired by Walter Burley Griffin.

    Design description:

    "This open concept of a light rail station is designed to incorporate free flowing open spaces whilst also having the option of creating shelter from the elements. The structural Hexapods act as artificial trees to form a canopy which can adapt according to the weather. The overhead canopy is designed to have final impact at ground level whilst working to create a sheltered neutral environment. They are fitted with light and... Continue reading


    Daramalan and Merici College team 'Team Metro' produced an environmentally responsive design. It's a collection of hexagonal pods that forms a canopy inspired by Walter Burley Griffin.

    Design description:

    "This open concept of a light rail station is designed to incorporate free flowing open spaces whilst also having the option of creating shelter from the elements. The structural Hexapods act as artificial trees to form a canopy which can adapt according to the weather. The overhead canopy is designed to have final impact at ground level whilst working to create a sheltered neutral environment. They are fitted with light and rain sensors, which allow them to open and close. In the event of intense rain and light showers the hexagonal beams will open to provide cover from the rain.

    The hexagonal shape is designed to collect the rain water in the centre, being drained away by beams. In the case of the centre beams, this runoff water will provide irrigation for the vertical wall garden. The beams will also open to allow for natural light, whilst also casting shadows for shade. The hexagonal shapes are lined with solar panels, which position themselves towards the sun; providing maximum energy absorption. With a self sufficient design, this station plan will be sustainable for the future. This basis of design can be used throughout the metro system, with variations on size and amount of beams depending on the space. However this example prototype has been placed in Gungahlin.

    Environmentally friendly materials such as recycled timber have been used throughout the station. Providing the outer layer of the beams, vertical plant garden, the hexagonal bench seats at the bases of the beams, and as a deck closer to the shops and other facilities. The whole complex is irrigated by runoff water from the roof and also further run off which is stored in underground tanks. Changes in our climate have been accounted for, with a rain water collection system from more torrential rain, a large shaded area to account for temperature rises and an open free flowing space to allow cool air to regulate the higher temperatures. The entire HexaPlex has been designed with sustainability in mind, for a system that will last and ensure the future of our capital.

    The hexagonal shape, which can be seen throughout the HexaPlex, is inspired by Walter Burley Griffin’s original designs of Canberra. By looking at sky-view plans of Canberra it is evident the hexagon was broadly used by Walter Burley Griffin as a means to connect the outer roots of Canberra. Taking inspiration from Burley Griffin, this Capital Metro station utilises the hexagonal shape to create an open station which can be accessed from all directions. This concept combines both historic design and modern innovation. Paths encourage people to leave their cars at home and either ride or walk, leaving their bike in one of the bike sheds at the station."

    Students: Tim Willington, Daniel Gaudiosi, Brianna Secko, Amanda Huot

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel